<![CDATA[If You’re A Special Needs Mom, You March For Life Every Day, by Andi Sligh]]>

My son was still a baby when the news broke that prenatal blood tests to detect Down syndrome were hitting the market (and yes, I do mean “the market” because these tests are big moneymakers for the companies who produce them). At the time, I expressed concern that the tests would lead to the abortion…

<![CDATA[Ignatian Discernment in Medical Decisions, by Christy Wilkens]]>

If there’s one thing parents of special needs kids encounter more frequently than most other people on the planet, it’s decision-making. n When God sends us children who require extra care and attention, he assigns us the responsibility of discerning wisely about issues that range far beyond their clothing, feeding, and education. Often, we are…

<![CDATA[A New Baptism: The Eyes of a Special Needs Parent, by Rachel Fussleman]]>

Strutting around the field, Antonio Brown took off his shirt in the middle of the football game and threw it in the crowd. He flew up the peace sign and left. Just like that! Abandoned his team and did something unthinkable. My first thought? Sarcastic humor and astonishment. I started scrolling through Twitter and laughed…

<![CDATA[Have a Special Child? Mary Can Relate, by Andi Sligh]]>

I’ve been doing this “special needs parenting” thing for almost two decades. Nineteen years ago last week, my daughter was born prematurely, spent almost two months in the NICU, and was diagnosed with cerebral palsy. My son, now eleven, was born with Down syndrome. I have never known what it’s like to parent a typical…

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The Accepting the Gift Home-Based Religious Education Curriculum

Since starting Accepting the Gift as a one day conference in 2019, I am always on the lookout for ways to better serve Catholic special needs parents. In my talks with fellow parents, through surveys, and through discussions in online forums I learned that many families are struggling to figure out their child’s religious education…

<![CDATA[A Few of My Favorite Things: When Expected Things Become Big Victories, by Rachel Fusselman]]>

Young, naïve, and stubborn. Those were the words that described me when I walked through the door of our two-bedroom apartment, holding all seven pounds of our first newborn. Seven years later, I became aware that I was a special needs parent to that same green-eyed boy who has my smile. The best part of…